Archive for January, 2011

Greetings, intro, etc.

January 31st, 2011 by Jack Styczynski

Welcome (and for some, welcome back) to “The Craft of Research,” the official research blog for the Spring 2011 Broadcast Craft class of John Schiumo and Marc Kusnetz.  It’s the spot for research lessons, handouts, news, tips and whatever else comes up during the semester.

My name is Jack Styczynski, and while this marks my sixth semester teaching research at the J-school, it’s my first in Broadcast Craft.  I couldn’t be more excited about the new assignment!

When I’m not here, I’m a researcher at NBC and the New York Times.  If you’re interested in more career details, click here.  One thing you’ll probably notice is that I’m a big college hoop-head.

Despite the fact I make a living as an online searcher, you may also notice past readings posted here and even my humorous Christmas post demonstrate a concern for the effects computers are having on us.  Matt Richtel of the Times often makes me feel old and feeds my fear.  For example, he shows why I worry about our brains on computers and why I don’t own a mobile phone.

Speaking of my concern with computers and stuff I’ve read in recent months, should we now fret about technology making some journalists obsolete? Or will Patch save us all?

This is tech! On my bike at the train station. No cell? No car since '95 either.

This is tech! On my bike at the train station. No cell? No car since '95 either.

Anyway, enough about me and my technology nightmares. I note that a few of you were busy during the break. Nathan Frandino had a story in the Daily News about Coptic Christians in Queens mourning a loss. Laura Shin had several bylines for OurTownNY. And Annais Morales had New York Post stories here, here, here, here, here, here and here, continuing her quest to be known as the hardest working woman in the biz. Either that or she’s addicted to getting love on this blog.

Research bonus: The Census Bureau’s American Community Survey now includes the first ever 5-year estimates from 2005-2009, and the New York Times has made some nice use of them.  On the subject of demographics, Social Explorer now has an excellent database of religion statistics right down to the PUMA level. We will be digging into Census and demographic numbers this semester.